Sub-titled ""A White Woman Looks At The Negro"", this is the first time, to my knowledge, that a white man- or woman-has...

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Sub-titled ""A White Woman Looks At The Negro"", this is the first time, to my knowledge, that a white man- or woman-has written about the Negro, not scientifically, not fictionally, but in terms of her own experiences in meeting the Negro as a social equal. This was during the war, in the interracial canteen she conducted, and which many will remember from Some Of My Best Friends Are Soldiers. Here is a humorist gone serious, as she tells casually of some critical moments, of the handling of her Junior Hostesses, of the only occasional (two or three) episodes provoked by the Negro, of the far more occasional Southern discomfort- as Southern servicemen registered protest. She reduces racial discrimination to two prime factors, the sexual bogey and the ""Would you like your daughter to marry one"" type of thinking, the economic factor and the question of cheap labor. And she provides the answer to what you or any citizen can do about it. A personal probe, which is also direct and dispassionate, and which- with her name as impetus- may reach a market where others have failed.

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946