Here Mrs. Laurence is crusading for a peaceful and creative coexistence of cultures, a theme she will later pursue in her...

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THE TOMORROW TAMER

Here Mrs. Laurence is crusading for a peaceful and creative coexistence of cultures, a theme she will later pursue in her autobiographical memoir- New Wind in a Dry Land. In several of the short stories in this collection she examines the European's often faulty adjustment to the new Africa. Often the European loves and feels he understands his Africa, but the relentless direction of the emerging nationalism constrains and restrains him:- a young European raised in Africa seeks again his childhood friend and is rebuffed by the now politically aware young African; an elderly schoolmistress attempts to help an English-educated girl find her identity as an African and renders herself helpless. There are Europeans who through good natured ignorance or rigidity strew malice before them -- a brittle English lady brings the meaning of freedom (unwittingly) to a market woman; a missionary drunk with zeal and intolerance is defeated by an African artist who paints Christ as an African; a pseudo-anthropologist is roundly hoodwinked by an enterprising ribesman. There are two sensitive stories with only African characters that reveal the author's love of tribal patois and ritual. Earnest stories and a diverting call disarm.

Pub Date: June 15, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1964