Marguerite Allis, while not a skilled novelist, manages to imbue her stories and characters with a convincing sense of place...

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LAW OF THE LAND

Marguerite Allis, while not a skilled novelist, manages to imbue her stories and characters with a convincing sense of place and time (Connecticut, 100 years age), and to introduce little known facets of national life and history. This story is built on conditions of the times, when women were mere chattels of their men and had no legal rights. The Barlows may have represented an extreme case, with Saul, resentful of his father's will, determined to get his sister's inheritance, and eventually forcing an unpalatable marriage on her. But Bella has strengths she had not recognized, wins an lly in Saul's frightened wife, and finds the man she loves. The chapter devoted to long journey to Rochester and the initial Woman's Rights Convention gives added flavor though it seems to weigh the research angle of the story unduly.

Pub Date: March 26, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1948