A vastly different theatrical story than Ethel Barrymore's (report on Memories follows) this picture of Laurette Taylor...

READ REVIEW

LAURETTE

A vastly different theatrical story than Ethel Barrymore's (report on Memories follows) this picture of Laurette Taylor comes from her daughter who doesn't close her eyes to her mother's weaknesses and who is generously loving and understanding of the magic and greatness she achieved. The explosive determinants inherited from her parents, the break-in on amateur stages, her marriage to Charles Taylor and her parts in his melodramas prefaced her return to New York and her dogged pursuit of a career there and when she met Hartley Manners her fame began. Legally divorced from Taylor, her marriage to Manners was not recognized by the Church but the public adored them from Peg O' My Heart on. Applause and adulation grew; there was Hollywood and her impossible love for John Gilbert; there was the social drinking that developed into a wrecking demon; there were the abandoned years following her husband's death, with a always a promise of making a comeback -- and failing to. With a final victory came the tremendous return in The Glass Menagerie and the despairing knowledge that alcohol would be blamed when it was her health that was going. This fascinatingly intimate look at a theatrical great has heartbreak in its honesty, compassion in its love and power and in its re-creation of a headstrong life. If the best-sellerdom of Lillian Roth's I'll Cry Tomorrow is any yardstick, this should certainly have a double-market, theater and alcoholism, sale.

Pub Date: May 2, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1955