A sophisticated and smoothly written teen age story again combines a small mystery and regional flavor with the solving of...

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LOST POND

A sophisticated and smoothly written teen age story again combines a small mystery and regional flavor with the solving of family problems as the more important element in the book. Pauline Franklin, 15, and a member of a large, well-to-do family of three sisters and their husbands who summer on her grandfather's estate in New Hampshire, is irritated when told she looks like her dictatorial Aunt Louisa Vaile, for Aunt Louisa disapproves of almost everything inquisitive, tomboyish Pauline does. In a leisurely way, with cousins, fathers and the local citizenry all in the picture, Pauline starts to hunt for Lost Pond, a local and semi-legendary body of water. In her wanderings she meets the Braymans, an artistic family whose son, Rufus, is a painter and quite different from Pauline's more conservative family. As she finds out more about the Braymans she also discovers Aunt Louisa's former connection with them and with the world of music. The comparison between Aunt Louisa, a once promising musician who refused to follow her talents, and Mrs. Brayman, a singer who did follow hers, brings Bauline the flash of intuition that reveals her aunt's character.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956