There is a quiet beauty in this retiring, almost dutiful reminiscence of a life. Marian Anderson tells her story with the...

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MY LORD, WHAT A MORNING

There is a quiet beauty in this retiring, almost dutiful reminiscence of a life. Marian Anderson tells her story with the simplicity and dignity and graciousness people have come to associate with her. There is the early family life in Philadelphia, with little money and much love, and the joys of buying a forty-nine cent dress or releasing an ailing mother from out-of-house work. There is the discovery of the magnificent voice as Marian sang in church, and the first training of that voice, the building of the great career in face of such set-backs as a trying Town Hall debut for which she was not yet ready -- and in face of indignities. The anguish caused by discrimination is handled with mature calm -- travel arrangements brought humor and misery, the concert in the Lincoln Memorial after the DAR'S stand on Constitution Hall brought victory. The career launched in Europe, the 1933 onslaught of ""Marian fever"", carried ever-increasing recognition in her own country as well. Honored for her citizenship with the Philadelphia Award, she used the money to establish-the Marian Anderson Scholarship for young singers; aware of her leadership as a prominent Negro, she has recognized the importance of the illustration of what can be. This is an expression of gratitude to the God who ""has the whole world in his hand"". Nevertheless, this is a self-conscious document with a sense of younger generation readership slipping in that may disappoint older readers.

Pub Date: Oct. 25, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1956