By no means a second Snake Pit, this is a morose, macabre study of a psychoanalyst and his very private world, of his wife,...

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DARK DOMINION

By no means a second Snake Pit, this is a morose, macabre study of a psychoanalyst and his very private world, of his wife, his wife's brother and his wife's lover, and their individual, pathological peculiarities- the strange, dream-ridden paths they pursue. Maurice Panohaud, a Swiss, coming to New York to see his sister Beatrice (with whom he is too closely identified), finds her after many years married to dour, bloodless Thomas Spine, an analyst, whose patient she had been. Beatrice, arid and aseptic, lives in a mirror of self-reflection, emerges for the first time from absorption in herself when she has an affair with the rather florid Stanley. Thomas, as queer a duck as any he treats, ignores Beatrice's defection, treats her with an even greater paternal and professional objectivity, is openly affected only at her death when after abandonment by Stanley- she suicides... An almost Dali-esque distortion of a profession and the personalities involved makes this a very drear disgression into this dark dominion which has none of the sympathy of Nine Own Executioner, and much that is exaggerated in its eccentricity.

Pub Date: Jan. 3, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1946