Where this concentrates simply on salary strategies, it has something new and potentially useful to offer. But the second...

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SALARY STRATEGIES

Where this concentrates simply on salary strategies, it has something new and potentially useful to offer. But the second half is concerned primarily with job hunting itself: the way to choose an organization, how to re-enter if you're a returning homemaker, how to transfer skills from one kind of job to another--all of which has been done better and more completely elsewhere. The gist of the salary situation: employers who hire you enjoy a decided edge in such negotiations, since they know what their company's salary structure and grade-level system will permit; whereas you haven't a clue what maximum figure they are able and willing to pay--either when you're hired or when you ask for a raise. How to combat this? Research what the market will bear in your chosen field; pin the boss down on your job description; negotiate in the win-win-win vein; etc. Kennedy claims that 60 percent of the people who are made a flat offer but ask for more, get more--even when the offer is supposedly final. She explains how you can be hired just before an annual upgrading of salary levels--and never quite reach the level of someone who was hired after You (without any intentional deceit on the employer's part). Inflation, it seems, makes it as necessary to ask about annual pay raise percentages as about the starting salary when you're interviewing for a job. And this confirms what the young upwardly-mobile are already discovering for themselves: they can maximize their earning potential by changing jobs every 12-18 months between ages 22 and 30. Some nuggets of information about how salary determination works--and how you can make it work for you.

Pub Date: Jan. 10, 1981

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rawson Wade--dist. by Atheneum

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1981