Hawaii, and the easy-going, relaxed tradition of native Kona, against the civilizing conventions of Honolulu, as...

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KONA

Hawaii, and the easy-going, relaxed tradition of native Kona, against the civilizing conventions of Honolulu, as counterpoint for the love stories of two generations. Problems of the half caste are integral to without dominating the story, as Martha, part Hawaiian, and brought up in the leisurely, free ways of Kona, marries Winslow, and his family, with their firm New England breeding. With the first child, Laurie, Martha almost breaks from the pompous, proprietary Winslow, but by the advent of the second child, she has adapted herself to his way of life, and forgotten the lotus-eating lures. Laurie, however, more Martha's child than the father's, is constantly at odds with him, and is always happier in Kona than in Honolulu, and she falls in love with a native Hawaiian. Martha defends her against Winslow, insists that she get the chance to live out the heritage which is hers likewise...Light, in spite of the thematic stress, pleasant reading for rental patrons largely.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947