Melvin Dog was kind, generous, thoughtful, dear, and altogether wonderful""--and as a result his friends so burden him with...

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TAKING CARE OF MELVIN

Melvin Dog was kind, generous, thoughtful, dear, and altogether wonderful""--and as a result his friends so burden him with requests that Melvin collapses and the doctor sends him to bed. Melvin's friends rally willingly; but between break-fast, when Melvin hesitates to ask friend Laverne Cat for anything so tiresome as cold cereal with raisins and cream, and lunch when he fires off a hundred-word order ("". . . under the roast beef I would like three pieces of light green lettuce with no brown spots whatsoever. . .""), Melvin becomes a tyrant. At the end of the day his friends leave him, regretfully. Lonely Melvin decides to go back to doing rather than demanding favors; but when he tries, his wiser friends let him know that he can be their friend simply by staying his ""super"" self. Spiced with Chess' wicked black-and-white pictures and the clipped humor of Sharmat's smartest picture-book style, it's all snappy fun with a sound, currently right-thinking foundation.

Pub Date: April 15, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1980