Calling the Bible a ""charter of liberty,"" the author sees the reader's approach to it as being to ""listen to what is...

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CONVERSATION WITH THE BIBLE

Calling the Bible a ""charter of liberty,"" the author sees the reader's approach to it as being to ""listen to what is said--and make your reply."" The Bible is a record of dialogue between God and men--""""between lovers."" This theme is developed in three main sections, dealing with, ""The Content of the Bible,"" ""The Authority of the Bible,"" and ""The Interpretation of the Bible."" In each of these, various approaches and interpretations are considered, and the values and limitations of each is weighed. The central thrust of the book is to help the reader venture into his own ""conversation"" with the Bible--or with God, through the Bible. The author combines a competent knowledge of recent scholarship with the ability to use simple, and often vivid style--""Exegesis is the enjoyment of the energy of a text. The book will best serve those, however, who are already familiar enough with the Scriptures to understand the textual references, and who are able to enter into the particularly Biblical world of thought, so different from the modes of thought in other realms of our culture. While not offering anything particularly new in Biblical interpretation; the book can be a useful study of the Bible from the dialogistical view.

Pub Date: Oct. 26, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1964