This somehow does not ring quite true. One feels it is a somewhat feeble echo of Mortal Storm, with many of the same...

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PASSPORT FOR A GIRL

This somehow does not ring quite true. One feels it is a somewhat feeble echo of Mortal Storm, with many of the same characteristics, less well blended. An English girl, slightly leftish in her sentiments, falls in love with an Austrian lad, part Jewish. The period is the time of the Anschluss. They escape together, to England, where she expects her step-father of the Foreign Office and her conventional, socially ambitious mother, to accept the youth with open arms as a prospective son-in-law. Intolerance, indifference and ignorance, sugar-coated but none the less a barrier, eventually break them down and they are separated, the boy to go back to Austria in a vain attempt to rescue his mother; the girl to fall desperately ill. The story is used as springboard for pages of outpourings on the subject of England's foreign and domestic policies, and European conditions generally. A disappointing book from Mary Borden.

Pub Date: May 18, 1939

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1939