The distaff side doesn't get much space in printed material about Space. It's a critical point that's been made again and...

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AMERICAN WOMEN OF THE SPACE AGE

The distaff side doesn't get much space in printed material about Space. It's a critical point that's been made again and again with varying degrees of Freudian insight about futuristic science fiction; in non-fiction, the convention is to describe scientists and technical crews as ""he."" This soothes the suffragette and fills the information gap with rundowns on the careers and contributions of some women who hold important and unusual positions in our Space research and development projects. One works on food, another on protective coverings and another on the interior comforts of space capsules -- home ec at its most scientifically glamorous. The others are equally impressive and much less connected with typical women's work. There are computer analysts, mathematicians, fuel experts, model makers and inventors among them. It's straightforward career information, consistently interesting and something to raise the occupational sights of girls.

Pub Date: March 22, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Athenuem

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966