In 1815, Mem's father decides that the family will sell their Connecticut farm and nearly everything else they own to load...

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JOURNEY TO NOWHERE

In 1815, Mem's father decides that the family will sell their Connecticut farm and nearly everything else they own to load up a wagon and make the long and hazardous trek to a new home in the Genesee Country of upstate New York. Mere and her mother see it as a journey to nowhere, to a desolate place with no house, no neighbors, no school--just endless forest. The trip is difficult from the start. After an unpleasant encounter with some turkey drovers, Mere gets separated from her family and seems hopelessly lost; the wagon turns over on a rickety bridge and much of the food and their few other possessions are washed away. The family pig--almost ready to birth a litter that will be needed on the new farm--is killed by a wolf, and Mere, too, is almost killed twice, first by a bear, and then by falling tree. Pleasant surprises await them at their new home: neighbors who pitch in to raise the family's cabin and barn, a real town only a day's journey away, and a school. It's an exciting tale, but the novel's real strength lies in the interesting characters and homely details of life on the frontier nearly two centuries ago, when Connecticut and New York were separated by more than a few hours on the interstate. From Auch (Eggs Mark the Spot, 1996, etc.), good historical details and a rattling good adventure.

Pub Date: May 1, 1997

ISBN: 0440414911

Page Count: 202

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 1997