This fully extroverted treatment of a rather inbred family situation is part of the chronology -- O Deulah Land- Know...

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FIGHT NIGHT ON A SWEET SATURDAY

This fully extroverted treatment of a rather inbred family situation is part of the chronology -- O Deulah Land- Know Nothing but while using the same West Virginia hill and coal country as a setting, it is the first of these which has a present tense as well as first person narrator. Hannah tells the story from the time when some drunken phone calls from her older brother Johnny, her ""talisman-mentor,"" bring her back home for a deathbed vigil after a ""fight night"" on a sultry Saturday night. Johnny, whom once she'd been trained to tag after, later to watch out for, dies and this is her purgative search for the answers-- through Jake Catlett, with whom he'd fought, of an old hill family now dirt poor; from her Uncle Ephraim; from Charley- at whose bar he'd go to drink; from Tel, his girl; and finally from their mother who had cultivated the family lie which is in part responsible for his death... Compared to the earlier books in the continuity, the characterization and the narrative have slimmed down; it's the Beulah Land and its tribal totems, its touchy pride and snobbery extending from the country club to the juke box, which leaves the strongest impression on the reader as well as those engaged in a story which has not too much more than a kind of determined urgency. Women only, ""I suspicion.

Pub Date: May 22, 1964

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1964

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