A fresh and refreshing collection of twenty-nine poems with ""Me"" as the narrator and ""Woody"" his older brother as...

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WOODY AND ME

A fresh and refreshing collection of twenty-nine poems with ""Me"" as the narrator and ""Woody"" his older brother as starting point of some insights and attitudes universal to the middle childhood years. Many of the collections we see here each year have the poet assuming the child voice and it is a most difficult one for an adult to sustain and still sound genuine. Many slide into too hushed, self-conscious, precious or priggish tones. Woody and Me has vigor. The narrator is restless, bored, thoughtful, bemused and amused by turns in poems that vary in length, don't seem to go on for any longer than necessary, and do persuade that this is a boy talking. One of the longest is a two part chronicle of the frustration inherent in losing a key to a wind-up toy. Another that will have immediate recognition value is ""The Morning That Seemed Like Forever"" when time got slower while the narrator was feeling fast. ""Tempers"" briefly and sharply identifies that condition of temporary deafness that strikes the person doing the shouting, and ""Candy or Canary?"" asks the question about adults children usually feel without verbalizing-- about why some people seem to prefer animals to children. The illustrations are the drawings of Ronni Solbert showing a boy slumping, jumping, always moving or about to move. These qualities capture the thought-in-motion characteristics of the free verse poems.

Pub Date: April 29, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Pantheon

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1966