Ten years ago, even five years ago, this bland, homogenized treatment of the court system would have been welcome, would...

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EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER LAW: Our Court System and How It Works

Ten years ago, even five years ago, this bland, homogenized treatment of the court system would have been welcome, would have filled a need; today the selector and the reader expect a little cream--even a little sour cream--in their content. From the lazy introduction to Courthouse Square onward, the text exhibits a vague anonymity, a lack of crispness and precision: the examples are all of the John Doe variety, something someone thought up to demonstrate what might happen to the average man in a typical court situation: the vocabulary is similarly uncommitted-- suppose, some people, may and might suggest but do not state. Sometimes the suggestions are oversimplifications or downright distortions, as when the author suggests that a series of contradictory court decisions resulted in a culmination (the right to counsel) or that Legal Aid Societies are staffed entirely by volunteer lawyers. The only sections that do not duplicate recent, better books are those on arbitration (though she does not distinguish between arbitration and mediation), the Children's Courts, and military courts. Court in Session (1966, p. 1062-J358) is more pointed and provocative on organization, procedures, and the implications of both; The Supreme Court and How It Works (this issue) gives more insight into the ramifications of a particular case and the responsibilities of the courts generally. Includes glossary and list of recommended reading (mostly adult titles); index promised also.

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shephard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966