As in Grifalconi's Darkness and the Butterfly (1987), a black child learns to face a fear with the help of an older person....

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STORM IN THE NIGHT

As in Grifalconi's Darkness and the Butterfly (1987), a black child learns to face a fear with the help of an older person. A thunderstorm has left Thomas and his grandfather without TV or light to read by, but they are not without resources. Grandfather knows some good stories: ""Thomas hadn't heard all of them yet, because he kept asking for repeats."" Thomas can't believe that Grandfather was ever a boy like him, but then--after Grandfather tells about hiding under the bed with his dog, Melvin, during storms, till the day he bravely set forth to rescue Melvin, who had been left out in a sudden storm--Thomas admits his own trepidation and perhaps realizes that Grandfather was once young, too. Stolz can be counted on for a thoughtful story, gracefully told, and she does not disappoint here. Though her text is quiet and perhaps overlong for its subject, the dark, vibrant page-and-a-half paintings by Cummings (Coretta Scott King Award for My Mama Needs Me) should hold attention. White highlights on the cat; the delicate, wind-blown curtains; and the old man's beard--plus creative use of blues and greens--effectively evoke the stormy night world. Thomas looks a bit old (both in his proportions and size), but perhaps that will extend the use of the book to independent reading by older children.

Pub Date: March 1, 1988

ISBN: 0064432564

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 1988