A novel of the Wobbly movement and the story of Olav Brekke, an adventurous, vigorous, restless young Norwegian who is drawn...

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THE COLOR OF RIPENING

A novel of the Wobbly movement and the story of Olav Brekke, an adventurous, vigorous, restless young Norwegian who is drawn to America to work in his uncle's lumber company in the midwest, and then attracted by new frontiers goes still further to the Pacific Northwest. There he becomes a logger and is swept along in the fervor of the I.W.W. Here are the itinerant workers and their high ideals, some of the almost fanatical in their devotion to the cause of the underprivileged. Here are those opposed to them, who try to run them off, the capitalists, the Pinkerton crew, etc. There are the two women Olav loved, first Sybil, provocative prostitute, then Marxana, who gave herself to the Wobbly cause. The story ends with the bloody massacre at Everett, in 1916, when the demonstrating Wobblies are shot at. The characters are convincingly enough drawn, but the canvas is too broad, the plot too thin to weave it all into a challenging whole.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Superior

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1949