An admiring account of the many activities and accomplishments of a public health officer, this begins with Dr. Geiger's...

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An admiring account of the many activities and accomplishments of a public health officer, this begins with Dr. Geiger's youth in New Orleans- and his exposure to the sporadic outbreaks of yellow fever and other tropical diseases. One of the few anchor men in this field, Geiger became a laboratory director of the California Department of Public Health, entered the federal service during World War I where he tackled malaria control and botulism, and then went to Chicago during the '20's where typhoid, venereal disease and political sepis were his particular trouble zones. Stationed in San Francisco during the next twenty odd years, there were some problems to be faced- the pasteurization of milk; vaccination against smallpox; the regulation of sanitation and prevention of food spoilage; the installation of an Emergency Hospital Service. Along with the many issues affiliated with his work, there were the honors which were his deserved reward. His story here, while focussed on the man, also offers a good deal of general information on the advances medicine has made in combatting and controlling a variety of diseases. It lacks however the dramatic sharpness and singular excitement of the Berton Roueche annals of this particular service.

Pub Date: Nov. 18, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1958