Those who want a break today--don't eat one of those overpriced 1.6 ounce burgers or 3 ounce ""quarter pounders."" The...

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BIG MAC: The Unauthorized Story of McDonald's

Those who want a break today--don't eat one of those overpriced 1.6 ounce burgers or 3 ounce ""quarter pounders."" The country's largest employer of young people pays below minimum wage, gives its employees lie detector tests to find out about union activity (then fires them), and is a serious drain on our natural resources (just think of all that waste paper). Ray Kroc, the middle-aged wizard who purchased franchise rights from the relatively cooled-out McDonald brothers in San Bernardino in 1954, is a combination of Henry Ford, Scrooge, Norman Vincent Peale, and George Wallace (as well as being one of the world's richest men). He hates teens, blacks, commies, long hair, and dirt, gave about a quarter million to Nixon, and may be our country's least popular symbol abroad since South Americans stoned Rocky's car. The authors document the growth of this most successful of all franchises only to demolish it, standardized-french-fry-scoop by standardized-malted-milk-maker. Worst of ali, Big Mac is not only tasteless, but expensive: $4.20 per pound when you discount the trimmings. All the Ronald McDonalds in the world--Donald McDonald for the Japanese--can't change that fact.

Pub Date: March 30, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976