From the social canvas of Invasion and the psychological conflict in Hath Not The Petter -- Van Der Meersch turns to a...

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L'ELU: The Chosen One

From the social canvas of Invasion and the psychological conflict in Hath Not The Petter -- Van Der Meersch turns to a religious problem -- the conversion of a simple, materialistic worker to faith. Simeon had consecrated his life to earthly things --devoting all the returns from his job to his son so that the latter would be well educated and would have sufficient leisure to live for enjoyment alone. But shortly after his marriage, the son contracts a lingering but fatal pulmonary disease -- and with the added pain of his wife's adultery -- he commits suicide, blaming his father for the monotony and aimlessness of his life. Simeon's wife shortly follows her son's escape, and Simeon is left with the realization that life is not an end in itself -- and that there is nothing ultimate in work, or love, without spiritual conviction. The motivation is not always credible -- but it is a moving piece of work, in the depth of thought as well as in the sincerity of the religious profession -- conveyed in a prose which is restrained and poetic.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Sequana (Albin Michel)

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1937