In this small volume May Sarton takes her place among a remarkably gifted group of modern American poets -- Elizabeth...

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THE LION AND THE ROSE

In this small volume May Sarton takes her place among a remarkably gifted group of modern American poets -- Elizabeth Bishop, Edith Hinrichs, Marguerite Young to mention a few. The body of their work may not be impressive, but they have all written a number of fine individual poems. They are not great but they are skillful, sensitive lucid and intense. Miss Sarton's work is marked by a kind of delicate passion, which often makes up for a certain weakness of technique. She is an ardent lover of freedom, of the great Western tradition of courage and the pursuit of truth; she is a great of their opposites. She has also a tender feeling for Flanders and the Flemish where she spent many years of her life; she has a deep response to the American landscape. Like so many women poets, her poems are not held together by any ordered continuity of thought, but the individual poems are spontaneous and finely wrought. The title poem is particularly noteworthy. Her earlier book of poetry was Inner Landscape, her novel Bridge of Years, was in its quiet way rather fine. Most of the poems in the present volume have appeared in the better literary weeklies and monthlies, so that she is well known to a considerable audience already. She deserves and probably will receive within the limits of the poetry market, a wider following.

Pub Date: March 18, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1948