A second novel (the first, Forgive Adam, was slight but promising) -- and one that more than fulfills the promise of the...

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AMERICAN DREAM

A second novel (the first, Forgive Adam, was slight but promising) -- and one that more than fulfills the promise of the first. A story of three generations that went to the making of Shelby Thrall, newspaper man groping on the edge of self-discovery and an understanding of what made the ""American dream"" for his father and his father's father. A shifting background -- the decks of a vessel in the throes of threatening mutiny; Boston and sedate drawing rooms; an adventurer seizing a chance to escape the bonds of conventionality and being caught by an emotional entanglement not bargained for; a product of Boston's strictest training carried beyond herself by successive shocks to her sensibilities; a Dakota mushroom town and a young Boston lawyer seeking new horizons; intolerance and ignorance in the saddle -- and eventual victory of the dream over the prejudice. Conflict in the past -- conflict in the present - but ever recurring the glimpse of the dream that carried them beyond. It's a long book, but packed with interest, and a rewarding book in its reaching out toward fresh pictures and ideals. The publishers are backing it as one of their Spring leaders. It's worth a gamble.

Pub Date: June 18, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1937