Back at Holy Cross College Michael Harrington -- born in 1928 into a middle class St. Louis Irish Catholic family -- learned...

READ REVIEW

FRAGMENTS OF THE CENTURY

Back at Holy Cross College Michael Harrington -- born in 1928 into a middle class St. Louis Irish Catholic family -- learned the underlying principles of his life: that ideas have consequences, that knowledge is related to ethical values, that philosophy is the continuing debate over mankind's most significant issues. One of those rare leftists who can use the epithet ""comrade"" and imbue it with dignity and meaning, Harrington has been on the barricades of all progressive battles of the past two decades, in coalition or in bitter confrontation with every important movement -- racial, economic, student, labor, Old Left, New Left, Trotskyist, Stalinist, etc. -- throughout the country. In an autobiography purposely fragmented to reflect that history of the times more than of the man -- hence distinct separations for politics, bohemia, emotional breakdown, religion when one wishes he'd let it all flow -- Harrington emerges in myriad contradictions: politically aware yet with a primitive Christian sense of mission, an atheist who mourns the death of God, Jesuitical, heretical, radical, but always as a dedicated Socialist who, contrary to popular myth, instead of blowing up post offices, has never stopped building bridges even though, as in the early 70's, there's little hope they'll hold.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Saturday Review Press/Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973