The Bright Young Man is a lightweight treatment, competently written, of a fairly ordinary fellow making his way in the...

READ REVIEW

THE BRIGHT YOUNG MAN

The Bright Young Man is a lightweight treatment, competently written, of a fairly ordinary fellow making his way in the world of business. Upon finding himself completely broke, Pete Cullen, in his early twenties, former football player, goes to work as a salesman in the California textile firm of his father's friend. Pete's father, after having some spectacular successes, died a business failure and a probable suicide. And a good part of the younger Cullen's meanderings through these pages are spent in the nowadays conventional search for a father substitute. In his case this proves fortuitous as he is soon taken under the wing of the company's president, Nathaniel Barlowe, when it becomes evident that Pete can sell even though he isn't totally devoted to his job or to business as a career. It helps Pete's cause also that Barlowe's nymphomaniac daughter has chosen Pete as her latest true love, an entanglement that the B.Y.M. would rather avoid, since he is himself involved in the pursuit of one of Barlowe's secretaries. Eventually Pete is promoted to the managership of the New York office, the only apparent reason for this being the fact that he is too new to the business to have acquired any prejudices. The author never really settles the question of Pete's commitment to his chosen field but in view of the lucrative prospects and the fact that Pete, in the final pages, is riding off with his girl, it obviously doesn't matter. Certainly for the reader it was never much of a problem.

Pub Date: May 2, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966