Trailing, tracking and spying appeal as early childhood pastimes, but these are lost arts in megalopolis. This book teaches...

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HOW TO BE A NATURE DETECTIVE

Trailing, tracking and spying appeal as early childhood pastimes, but these are lost arts in megalopolis. This book teaches actively and vividly what to look for and how to figure out what it is you see. Cat, dog, rabbit, fox, frog and deer tracks are described for their special characteristics and shown by the artist so that young readers can start tracking across the page as soon as the text mentions a different animal, bird, or reptile. Although animal tracks get most of the space, there are reminders that the nose and the imagination help the eyes of the detective. Who put by this pile of shells? Or, what went around this mound or that depression in the beach sand? These questions lead to elementary step-by-step recreation/deduction in a manner Sherlook himself would have approved. A handsome, bound-to-be-popular book.

Pub Date: April 27, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1966