New Yorker, readers will welcome this extended portrait of English county life after the war, characterized by the subtlety,...

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ONE FINE DAY

New Yorker, readers will welcome this extended portrait of English county life after the war, characterized by the subtlety, the delicate sense of social commentary which distinguished her Letters from London. This records but does not lament the passing of the old families and the authority of birth, of the elegance of the drawing room, the refinements of tradition, and in Laura and Stephen Maxwell she presents a generation ill-equipped to meet the new world. Here are their days, as Laura attempts to fellow a domestic chalk line, but finds their servantless house too much for her Stephen fines his garden too him. There are the villagers; Mrs. gives a hand with the cleaning, pries, and supplies gossip; the slatternly Porters when the war has liberated from menial service; Mrs. Herriot, Laura's mother, firmly and arbitrarily aristocratic, and so on. There is little story rather sketches of England today which for all their awareness, sensitivity, acuity, may not capture American readers.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: 086068587X

Page Count: -

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly-Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947