Christianity, the author believes, owes its debt to Paul on three counts: his insistence on freedom from the law -- or...

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REAPPROACHING PAUL

Christianity, the author believes, owes its debt to Paul on three counts: his insistence on freedom from the law -- or rather, the misuse of the law to support claims to self-righteousness; his protest against the morality of the Hellenic world which has given us a basic morality; and his establishment of fellowship among believers. In developing these themes, Professor Enslin goes into considerable detail to show that Paul's letters, rather than Luke's biographical sketch in Acts, is the true source of our understanding of Paul and of his life. Much of this discussion will seem irrelevant to the lay reader, and of dubious cogency to the scholar. Paul's Gospel becomes an Ethic, suitable especially to our ""settled"" times -- ""unlike the apparently insolvent, if not irresponsible emphasis of Jesus."" What is missing here is any significantly new and illuminating treatment of Paul, beyond the old controversies of a past liberalism.

Pub Date: Nov. 13, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Westminster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972