A pleasant, unassuming autobiography which might well be used instead of the book of service etiquette (Army Wife, Airforce...

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CAPTAIN'S BRIDE, GENERAL'S LADY

A pleasant, unassuming autobiography which might well be used instead of the book of service etiquette (Army Wife, Airforce Wife etc. by Nancy Shea) to give aspirants in the Service an introduction to what it is like. Maurine Clark tells her story with due restraint and modesty, with a keen sense of the humorous side of life -- and her own mishaps, with devotion to her husband, his role in the Army, and the family obligations. The reader accompanies the Clarks on what is a fairly consistent upward march, with few setbacks- and those of a personal nature. One shares the heartache of separation- though the aura of fear is played down. This emerges as perhaps first of all a good Army family story, with the whole of the United States as the stage. Secondarily, it is General Clark's own story, as reflected by his wife, with second sight of necessity substituted for the first hand record of his own two books, Calculated Risk and From the Danube to the Yalu. Then it goes beyond the scope of these war experiences to include the period of occupation in Austria, with the family in residence, and occupation in Japan, where Mrs. Clark helped to launch some of the rehabilitation program that has helped put Japan back on its feet. One gets at the end a sense of General Clark's restiveness in carrying out policies with which he was unsympathetic in the Korean armistice, but in the main this is not to be regarded as a political book.

Pub Date: April 30, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956