Somewhere, far away, they had left the city"" -- with no explanation or need of one, and only the facing illustration...

READ REVIEW

COME AWAY

Somewhere, far away, they had left the city"" -- with no explanation or need of one, and only the facing illustration indicating that ""they"" are a blond, gaily sombreroed boy and girl escaping over rooftops. The children come to a spot of waist-high grass and wild flowers that smells green and new, and as they take off their shoes and play about with the blossoms, her everyday dress and his shirt, tie and trousers are replaced by fantastical kimonos. Mark finds something black and tire-shaped with two antennae, ""making her own sticky white roadway all over the wall,"" Alice catches sight of something tiny silhouetted against the sun, and neither child wishes to leave (though the sun and the pages are turning red and their names are called from a distance) until the creatures answer their greetings. Then Alice points out that Mark's find is a snail, Mark shows Alice that her ""friend in the sky,"" just come down, is a bird, and when the bird and snail have left the scene, the children agree that ""It's time to go."" Livingston's idly fanciful outing never fulfills the expectations she rouses at the start, though Irene Haas' ripe dreamy pictures help substantiate both the tissue-airy mood and the implied message that there is a natural fairyland to be found in every meadow.

Pub Date: April 17, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1974