With The Sisters Myron Brinig proved that he had the capacity for telling a warmly human story not dependent for interest or...

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MAY FLAVIN

With The Sisters Myron Brinig proved that he had the capacity for telling a warmly human story not dependent for interest or appeal on the lewdness so inescapable a factor in some of his earlier books. Now comes May Flavin substantiating the claim set up by The Sisters and you might call it an American Katrina in city garb. It is the story of a girl brought up in the Irish quarter of Chicago, of her marriage to her sister's cast-off sweetheart, and of the life she evolved for herself and her children in the slums of New York. A tremendous zest for life, a depth of emotional fibre, a fierce pride, and boundless physical energy, brought her through a succession of tragedies -- and not until she was faced with a life of ease and nothing to do does she falter. It's grand characterization and a good tale.

Pub Date: June 20, 1938

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar & Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1938