And fall they do in Newbold Morris' personal record as lawyer, as Alderman, as co-worker of Florello LaGuardia and as the...

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LET THE CHIPS FALL

And fall they do in Newbold Morris' personal record as lawyer, as Alderman, as co-worker of Florello LaGuardia and as the ousted investigator whose tenure lasted but two months after he was hired to investigate corruption in the national civil service. It was in 1952 that a hesitant Morris went to Washington to organize a department to do she job. He was sure he would upset many carts and evidently he started to, for his disissal came shortly and oddly enough simultaneously with the resignation of his chief, Grath himself. It is then, after the ""last fling"" of his career that Mr. Morris recapitulates a life of hunting corruption and investigations of the kind that should be at remedial legislation rather than personal gain. As far back as the days of Schultz, when Morris was fresh out of Yale law school, he was shocked that such a could bribe a tax man by promising to ""win"" an election the right way. This calization was closely followed by Morris' long and fruitful acquaintance with LaGuardia. It was a rich association that drove many a bad man from town, saw the development of many projects. Through Morris we get a rather vivid picture of LaGuardia as the opinionated and unsparing political genius he was. A political portrait of New York as well, these molrs show Morris as a man of humor and a refreshing naivete that kept his outlook jaded.

Pub Date: March 16, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Appleton-Century-Crofts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1954