If it looks shiny, feels cold, carries electricity, and bends without breaking, it's metal. If it's pulled to a magnet, it's...

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IF IT SHINES, CLANGS & BENDS, IT'S METAL

If it looks shiny, feels cold, carries electricity, and bends without breaking, it's metal. If it's pulled to a magnet, it's probably iron or steel. (No explanation of what steel is.) Separating a metal from its ore is called smelting. Only a small amount occurs free. Ancient peoples used these free nuggets for trinkets and small tools. Smelting was probably discovered by a pottery-maker. Later, metal workers learned to mix alloys. Ages are named for the metals used. Today, we use so much we might run out, but ""if we recycle metal things instead of throwing them away, we will always have a supply of that wonderful material called metal."" All this, with little or no inflection, elaboration, or explanation, in 35 short paragraphs and an equal number of equally perfunctory drawings. All what, no why, and dead as a door knob.

Pub Date: Feb. 6, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1980