Mrs. Hoyt dealt with English and other Western European Witches in 1969; here she concentrates on the less familiar demons...

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DEMONS, DEVILS AND DJINN

Mrs. Hoyt dealt with English and other Western European Witches in 1969; here she concentrates on the less familiar demons of the ancient and modern Near East, Asia and the Pacific. However, she doesn't hesitate to return to European sources when the story or the magic recipe is sensational enough, and she admits in her introduction that ""I have made a random selection of these evil spirits according to no certain pattern"" in order to ""give the reader a lively glimpse of the creatures."" It is no wonder then that she presents the folk beliefs of Japan, India and Arabia as exotic curiosities, and certainly misrepresents Chinese medicine in her offhand assertion that "". . . in China too illness and disease are thought to be caused by the evil spirits. If anyone who has been in good health is suddenly attacked (by dizziness, eye pain or paralysis) the illness is ascribed to the malignant power of one of 72 evil beings. Immediately steps must be taken to bet rid of this diabolical influence."" At least there is no implication here of Western superiority for Hoyt ends with a quotation from the Pope expressing his concern about the contemporary work of the Prince of Darkness, a history of the Maryland case that became the basis for The Exorcist, and a Washington Post interview with one Rev. Ryan, ""a highly placed Catholic official,"" who believes in possession and exorcism. Hexploitation.

Pub Date: May 2, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Abelard Schuman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974