His best book since Laughing Boy and a theme that is the cause of much discussion and many heartaches. The social...

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THE ENEMY GODS

His best book since Laughing Boy and a theme that is the cause of much discussion and many heartaches. The social implications of this revealing study of the effect of white ""civilization"" and education on a Navajo boy, carry more weight than any number of weighty documents. Taken by force to a government school at six, the lad resists and finally succumbs to the religious and educational forces. After ten years of confusion and final acceptance, he returns for a holiday to his family, and is caught in the web of his tribal beliefs and traditions. Then back again to the white world, again a denial of his background, and ultimate confusion and disintegration. The story is a gripping one; the intimations of politics and dissention among the leaders and gross ignorance and indifference and hypocrisy will cause a good deal of controversy. But La Farge has attempted no judgment, offered no solution. He simply tells his story. The publishers are counting this as their leading fiction title of the Fall, have posters, giant books, and a substantial advertising appropriation for sales aids. A book for La Farge fans -- and for anyone interested in the Indian problem.

Pub Date: Oct. 19, 1937

ISBN: 0865346712

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1937