This is an unofficial, interpretive, for the most part expository report on the findings and recommendations made in the...

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THE HOOVER REPORT 1953-1955

This is an unofficial, interpretive, for the most part expository report on the findings and recommendations made in the official report of the second Hoover Commission. The Commission, which functioned from 1953 to 1955, probed economy and efficiency throughout the executive branch of government. The postal and civil service systems, Bureau of Mines, Department of Defense, Foreign Operations Administration- these among seemingly countless institutions came under review. Activities as varied as baking, printing and fertilizer production were studied exhaustively. The range of recommendations includes a proposal for an aristocracy or ""senior"" group among civil servants; methods of avoiding duplication and overstocking in the purchase of supplies; and an immense shift of Federal business into the hands of private enterprise. To an extraordinary degree the authors succeed in covering, explaining, and organizing the achievements of the Commission. The book, however, so obviously, so forcibly, so determinedly points up the ""dangerous"" extent of Government participation in business, the presumed benefits of undoing this participation, and the services of the Hoover Commission on behalf of private enterprise-so that all proportions are lost and the reader comes to doubt the objectivity of the authors. For some economists, businessmen, and conservative citizens with a do-or-die capitalist belief.

Pub Date: April 24, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956