A parable of modest proportions idles with the concept and conflict of man- the political animal- and man- the human being,...

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THE PICNIC AT SAKKARA

A parable of modest proportions idles with the concept and conflict of man- the political animal- and man- the human being, and as such offers an ironic narrative of unexpected events and preposterous situations. The victim of these is gentle Edgar Perry, a professor, imported from England to Egypt where his wife Mary joins him- to announce her plans for divorce. Edgar, a favorite at the Court, has espoused the cause of bettering student conditions (they live like animals) but is assaulted during a student riot, saved by the Moslem agitator Muawiya who again rescues him when he is taken into custody after a second demonstration. During the picnic at Sakkara, intended as a mark of respect for the Englishman now hailed as a savior, it is Muawiya who this time turns against him, and while his attempt to assassinate him fails- it is reported as suicide. All of this makes a man of Edgar in Mary's eyes- he assumes the glamor of despair- and her solicitude breeds a new affection which determines her decision to stay with him as they leave Egypt together.... All in all, an idiosyncratic venture in the mock-heroic- this is for special tastes largely to be acquired.

Pub Date: Aug. 23, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1955