The big square house came awake again at tea time. From outdoors, where the afternoon was still warm, and the light was a...

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MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE

The big square house came awake again at tea time. From outdoors, where the afternoon was still warm, and the light was a melting pale peach color, came a glow that filled the formal drawing room with a mellow twilight."" Excerpting lines (a sometimes criticized critical ploy) seems very justified since Paul Horgan's new novel (which is not like any of his old ones) is written just in this way from start to finish-- golden people drift through an ambience of ceremonious graciousness (debutante balls, opening night at the opera, etc.). The story is almost as wraith- like and it hovers over two sisters, Doro (Dorothy) Hopkinson and Vivi (Guinevere) Grace, their marriages into the Navy and the return of Doro's husband seriously invalided after the first war, the non-return of their only son David, after Corregidor, and her benison on the boy's wife at the close who will marry his oldest friend who had witnessed his death in a prisoner camp. That's about it. Taps at twilight. But in spite of the title, Memories of the Future belongs more to the past -- in the gloaming of soluble sentiment.

Pub Date: May 19, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966