Another serious problem is sensibly and sympathetically handled by Pearl Buck in a book that maintains the former standards...

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THE BEECH TREE

Another serious problem is sensibly and sympathetically handled by Pearl Buck in a book that maintains the former standards of her books for children. Many families sooner or later are beset with old people and what happens to young Mary Lou's here, when Grandfather comes to live with them on their farm, could be typical. Where Mother had been happy before, she turns quiet and pensive at Grandfather's arrival. But Mary Lou is a gay child. She makes friends with Grandfather, does not mind caring for him when he needs it and is quick to respond to his understanding nature that dislikes asking favors and treasures the days when he can walk out doors with Mary Lou. On one such day they stop by the beech tree and Grandfather explains that the old, like the tree, send their spirit to the new young roots. This is enough to make Mary Lou intervene when she hears her Mother and Father planning to send the old man to a home because of the depressing effect they think he is having on the children. In discussing things openly a new realization, of people as humans rather than old and young, awaits them all.

Pub Date: March 17, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1955