Another of the ""conversation pieces"" in which Pearl Buck has investigated various human problems of today's world. This...

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AMERICAN ARGUMENT

Another of the ""conversation pieces"" in which Pearl Buck has investigated various human problems of today's world. This time she explores some phases of the minority problem, specifically, in the main, the problem of the Negro in America. She follows the same procedure as in the others,- Mrs. Paul Robeson supplying the ""other voice"", with first hand evidence on the Negro side. Incidentally, there are bits of Pearl Buck's own childhood in China, as a member of the white minority, set off against Mrs. Robeson's own rather unusually privileged (for a Negro child) youth, education, opportunities. Much of the material is American rather than Negro, but recurrently there is the awareness of unequality of opportunity, the factors providing obstacles, the assurance that given equal chance, the percentage of success would be equal. There are diversions, as Pearl Buck writes of adoption, as Eslanda Robeson talks of the Russian experiment, with a certain degree of fervor and approval. In final analysis, while they are together on ends, they differ rather sharply on means. In conclusion, Mrs. Buck urges willingness to change, acceptance of sacrifice and some degrees of security for the greater goal. The idea behind these books is an excellent one. But most readers find written conversation less easy to follow than reasoned argument.

Pub Date: Jan. 20, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1948