Very different from the involute distortion of Janet Frame's work, this seventeen year old youngster tells her story in a...

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A FOREST OF FEATHERS

Very different from the involute distortion of Janet Frame's work, this seventeen year old youngster tells her story in a nameless first person from the inside of a state institution. Most of it, except where now and again she sheers off into a dark limbo behind a locked door (""Hell is one door deep... Air-proof, water-proof, idea-proof, hope-proof"") has a very wide awake lucidity: she hates birds; she hates her mother, a cold, classy woman who left her there because it was cheaper than a private hospital; she loves Clemmie Clover, one attendant; and Amanda, a former teacher, who gave her good grades and goof balls; and Alan, who is released and never writes to her. Actually she's more abandoned than lost-- also by the father (not seen in eight years) who comes to visit her once and disappears; and all the doctors' talk about ""Facing Reality"" comes down to accepting the world she must return to--- alone... It's not important but it is appealing-- ""I wonder if there is such a thing as a fancy classification for Thrown Away?"" Sympathy surfaces every page.

Pub Date: March 9, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966