In many ways, Peter Everett has made a print of his earlier novel Negatives; a number of the same aberrant occupations and...

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THE FETCH

In many ways, Peter Everett has made a print of his earlier novel Negatives; a number of the same aberrant occupations and preoccupations reappear (sexual fetishes of all kinds; and pictures--pictures). Like Ann Quin (Berg Three) he is one of the younger English writers who deals in sluggishly close, confined situations, but Everett is a much more remarkable writer, per se. The Fetch, to clear one thing up at the beginning, is a doppel-ganger and when Bruno, thirtyish, impossibly inadequate after a childhood with a strong father, returns home after his father's death, it is to find his Uncle Elia standing in for him. Bruno has been projectionist in a London cinema and ""used to living in world of uncertain addresses, human failure, seedy houses, lies, deceits...."" He has also projected himself more gloriously as Bruno Eisenstein, Fellini, Bunuel. He thinks in images, and Elf, a young women with insatiable erotic whims but also the debris of his past, letters, snapshots and memories. All of this is quite disconsolate, latently curious and insinuating and intense and--insofar as the general reader is concerned--isolating.

Pub Date: March 14, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966