This volume by a Capuchin priest, who is lecturer in psychology at the University of Cork, Ireland, aims primarily to...

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FREUD, PSYCHOANALYSIS, CATHOLICISM

This volume by a Capuchin priest, who is lecturer in psychology at the University of Cork, Ireland, aims primarily to integrate the teachings of Freud and Catholic thought. It is directed principally to Catholic students of psychology and psychiatry, but is aimed as well at the non-professional, educated layman, Catholic and non-Catholic alike. The first section deals with the history and general nature of scientific psychology and then considers the subject of Freud and religion. Although he admires Freud personally for his devotion to truth and agrees with many of his conceptions in whole or in part, the author accredits Freud's hostility to religion to rational misunderstandings and unconscious motivations affecting his approach to religion in general and to Judaism and Catholicism, to which he had separate reactions, in particular. The second section contains a critical exposition of basic Freudian concepts, in the course of which the author displays a very positive appreciation of Freud's contributions and indicates the feasibility of integrating them with Catholic thought, once certain qualifications and correctives are applied. The third and last section is perhaps the most original part of the book. In it the author considers the subject of literature and psychology, integrating the doctrines of Aristotle's Poetics, Freudian psychology and modern literary criticism as they shed their respective light on the problems of literary creation. A select bibliography is appended.

Pub Date: Feb. 5, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Regnery

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1957