Stevenson follows a course many sports writers have run before from the early scrambles for the Gordon Bennett International...

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THE GREATEST DAYS OF RACING

Stevenson follows a course many sports writers have run before from the early scrambles for the Gordon Bennett International Cup to Steve McQueen's near win at Sebring. However, his sharp sense of humor and willingness to criticize what he considers sports car racing's decline into a commercial ""spending race"" make this an exceptionally energetic history. The great engineers receive as much attention here as the flashier drivers -- with the mystique of the Bentleys and the revolutionary designs of Dr. Ferdinand Porsche emerging as more crucial factors than, say, the personalities of the ""Three Musketeers"" or the driving prowess of Phil Hill. Despite Stevenson's interest in the technical aspects of racing, he is nostalgic for the old days when racing cars were essentially modifications of all-purpose cars, and he finds the McLarens' Can Am victories the epitome of dullness. It's a pleasure to meet up with someone who still believes that sports should be fun, and Stevenson makes a good case for his claim that the good old days really were the Greatest Days of Racing.

Pub Date: Nov. 15, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972