The familiar filibuster, and again strictly for shock effects in a one-man monologue which forecasts a holocaust, or...

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THE DISAPPEARANCE

The familiar filibuster, and again strictly for shock effects in a one-man monologue which forecasts a holocaust, or possibly a hallucination, when for four years there is a world without women for the men, without men for the women. In particular this features this catastrophe through the lives of one family, Bill Gaunt, a philosopher, Paula, his wife, and Edwinna, their twice-divorced daughter. For the men, left to do- or not to do- their housework, there are graver problems of war and peace; for the women, there is panic and hunger and uncontrollable death, as well as the many unknowns of running banks and gasoline stations and the country in general. And for Mr. Wylie, there is again an unlimited, unlicensed indulgence in many conversational forays from Freud to Jung, to Russia, the atom bomb, and obviously sex and the deviations such a situation provokes, which amounts to little other than a re-wording of previous talking points.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Rinehart

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1950