The author of The Undersea Adventure enlarges on and points up material of this previous book -- the sunken treasure trove...

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4000 YEARS UNDER THE SEA

The author of The Undersea Adventure enlarges on and points up material of this previous book -- the sunken treasure trove that opens new doors in history. This combines a discipline of ancient sources and texts, omniverous research and investigation, and imaginative curisoity, to link submarine recoveries to their dry land archaeological brothers. Particularly this is an account of the discoveries at Mahdia in all their aquatic circumstances; of the work at Antheor, Albeng, in the Mediterranean; of diving along the Monaco-Narbonne, Fos-sur-Mer coast, and at Cherchel off Africa. What he finds rich and instructive is imparted through his mystique of the sea and his feeling for the tangible finds that are proof of the cargoes, trade, artifacts, events, vessels, art and social conditions of pre-history. For here are the amphorae, traces of wine, markings, nails, tons of marble, coins, sculpture that require scientific testing as well as a relationship to a long investigative chain of fact-checking before they yield their whole story, or even part of it. Besides the underwater conditions is the necessary knowledge of sites to be explored and the changing methods each demands; from the ""rag picking"" of the 1907 -- 1913 missions to the improved techniques of today come the increased multi-scienced ability to analyze and approve for museum purposes; and all is colored by a man's absorption in the documentary evidence still available for contemporary interest. A pin-pointing that takes you from clue to clue as evidence is disclosed and photographs that will make the text more vivid. Currently you could say antiques have given way to antiquity.

Pub Date: May 12, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Messner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1954