Once again Phyllis Bentley has used her West Riding background for a story of textile manufacturers. It is amazing that she...

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THE RISE OF HENRY MORCAR

Once again Phyllis Bentley has used her West Riding background for a story of textile manufacturers. It is amazing that she can recapture the interest each time, for her stories are slightly plotted and once read, there is a sense of returning to familiar, well-trodden ground. However she peoples her stage with credible characters, she makes the changing customs in the industry alive and important, and she gives one a sense of a stalwart part of an England that survives. This story comes up to the present, and spans the life of Henry Moroar, who starts as a poor boy in a mill and becomes one of the powers in the industry. Closely linked with his career is the story of the other mills,- the Shawn, where he first worked and speedily found he wasn't wanted, only to return in later years; and Oldroyd's where he was given his chance. There is also the story of his marriage and its tragic aftermath; of the first World War and the death of his closest friend; and his love affair with Christina, whose life is taken in the Blits. It is not exciting reading- but a pleasant and solid bit of England.

Pub Date: Dec. 5, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1946