Reynolds' name will give this greater impetus than the book would otherwise carry. The aftermath of war will inevitably...

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Reynolds' name will give this greater impetus than the book would otherwise carry. The aftermath of war will inevitably abound in stories of this kind- we've had several already, Wolfert's American Guerrilla outstanding among them. While not minimizing the vitality of presentation- Quentin Reynolds tells a grand story and has made Master Sergeant Manuel's yarn come to life- I am doubtful as to whether it can take the hurdle of public saturation or apathy. Manuel, bombardier and sole survivor of a wrecked Fortress, made land on New Guinea and spent nine precarious months there, virtually in the midst of Jap encampments, made friends of the natives and with their aid eventually joined forces with some Australians, and was taken off by a submarine. Reynolds has told Manuel's story in Manuel's terms. Personally, though the miracle of these survivals never ceases to make absorbing reading, I felt that this fell far below his previous story of the river pilot in China- Officially Dead- in freshness and originality.

Pub Date: July 11, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1946