A novel of the Israeli war with the Arabs, Bring My Sons is fairly modest in execution although it attempts to cover a great...

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BRING MY SONS FROM FAR

A novel of the Israeli war with the Arabs, Bring My Sons is fairly modest in execution although it attempts to cover a great chunk of the war. Large actions are recapped while minor skirmishes stretch over two or three chapters. In 1948 our 20-year-old American hero from Virginia flits into France, gets some false papers as a D.P. and is soon bound for Tel Aviv to join the Jewish army. The first U.N. truce is currently in effect. He gets taken on as half-track driver, receives blistering letters from his Jewish parents back home. Meanwhile, he comes intimately to know his officers, a handful of men and a young Sten-gun girl radio-operator. She was formerly with the Irgun ""terrorists."" (""'Terrorist' is a word the British called us, not the Jews."") After his baptism of fire, he is soon bedding down with--well, her name is Shulamit, right out of The Song of Songs. The novel is interspersed with many long strips of biography for several characters, at times only of tangential interest. The climax has nothing to do with the subject war (reuniting a soldier and his parents), while the split between the homebound American and his love seems more fortuitous than the author admits. She would probably be a victim of antisemitism from his Virginian parents.

Pub Date: May 23, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: World

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966